Welcome to the New Minimalism classroom

You're here because you're passionate and committed to creating a home that is simple, easy-to-maintain, orderly and deeply inspiring.  You're also here because you're a self-starter.  When someone on the playground told you "I bet you can't do that!", you are the type of kid who went out of your way to prove that you can.  Now is the time to recruit that same energy and focus.

At its heart, this curriculum will bring you up-to-speed on the most important principles, ensuring your decluttering work is effective and lasting.  Below are the four assignments to get you on track for a kickass Consultation.

Let's get started!

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Calendar Date Desired:

1. UPLOAD A VIDEO:

Please take a short video of your space, narrating as you go.  Don't worry - we've seen it all! Don't forget to open cabinets and drawers so we can see the contents.  Upload the video to youTube and send us the link: hello@newminimalism.com


2. Required Reading: 

Carefully read these articles.  Perhaps make a cup of tea and cuddle up for a quiet hour.  If these concepts are new to you, we recommend that you give each article space and time to sink in before moving on to the next.  We will ask follow-up questions in the self-assessment.  

Ending the Cycle of Busy

Drastically Increase Your Standards

New Minimalism's 11 Core Principles

The One Reason We All Have Clutter

The 11 Declutter Questions You Should be Asking Yourself

Contentedness: You Already Have Enough  (Leo Babauta)


3. CATEGORY-Specific Reading:

Pick a topic that resonates with you and read one linked article.

Wardrobe: The Capsule Wardrobe by Un-fancy, and shopping rules to live by from Zero Waste Home.

Kitchen: Zero Waste Home has simple habits, routines, and thoughtful purchases which help her family of four be mostly waste-free.

Family: Pretty much anything written by Becoming Minimalist, but especially this, this, and this.

Habit Change:  Zen Habits is the ultimate resource for shifting from behaviors and mental pathways that aren't serving us. Read more here, here, here and here.

Moving Homes: Karen Kingston wrote one of our favorite articles of all time here.

Memorabilia + Emotional Clutter: I love the articulate, thoughtful frankness of The Minimalist's approach to clearing emotional items.  They're truly walking the walk and can show you how here, here, here, and here.

Bedroom: Our own article on making your bedroom into a restful retreat.


4. SELF ASSESSMENT

Like all journeys in life, you must first establish where you are in order to know where you are going.  

Fill-out the self-assessment only once you have finished all the reading.  Allow approximately 20 minutes to complete the assessment.  Once we receive your self assessment results, we will know that you have concluded your New Minimalism curriculum!

 
Image via Bloglovin

Image via Bloglovin

 
Image via Modern Legacy

Image via Modern Legacy


EXTRA CREDIT: NM CORE LIBRARY*

For the voracious readers, autodidacts, and naturally curious, we've compiled a list of our favorite websites and books relating to minimalism.  These are the writers who helped shape the New Minimalism philosophy and continue to inspire us today.  Some books directly relate to clutter-clearing, while others elucidate the connections between our desires and how inherently that relates to simple, intentional living.

Everything That Remains by The Minimalists (Joshua Fields Millburn and Ryan Nicodemus)

SoulSpace by Xorin Balbes

Clear Your Clutter with Feng Shui by Karen Kingston

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo (and our review)

The Story of Stuff by Annie Leonard

The Power of Less by Leo Babauta

Zero Waste Home by Bea Johnson

Becoming Mininalist by Joshua Becker

Broader topics, but as you'll learn - it's all related!

The Desire Map by Danielle LaPorte

Your Money or Your Life by Vicki Robin and Joe Dominguez

A New Earth by Eckhart Tolle

The Untethered Soul by Michael Singer

Mr. Money Moustache (www.mrmoneymoustache.com)

 

*At New Minimalism we physically own about 25% of these books -- yes, even though they are our favorites!  When we want to revisit certain passages, we simply visit our local public library.  We recommend that you do the same.